Accelerated Withdraw from Afghanistan War. Not soon enough. Here is the war clock as of January 11, 2013

My comments on our 'accelerated withdraw from Afghanistan':

Immediately is not soon enough.
Soldiers Lost: 2,083...
Soldiers Wounded: 23,500+...
Taxpayer Cost: $601780133410 ...
Years Lost: 11 Years 3 months 4 days
BENEFIT TO AMERICA = NOTHING after we defeated the Taliban 10 years ago.

Does a person weep because of depression? Or, to heal FROM depression?

My single day costs for being run over was over $38,000 -- and rapidly climbed to over $88,000 in a single week. Financial pressure just adds to the bitterness of depression. My work is inexpensive anddoesn'tcrush you beneath a mountain of expenses. I truly understand sorrow and depression. I am truly interested in helping you! By using Depression Symptoms Decoded After Injury you will empower yourself to rapidly understand all your healing needs. This is both life-saving and inexpensive. However, let me ask: Does the body weep to be depressed, or to be healed of depression?Did the light turn on? Do you see the major difference in the approach to your symptoms of depression? Would the human body waste time on doing something that served NO purpose in preserving the organism?I want you to get happy. I don't want your symptoms to be part of the mystery of your depression. Your symptoms are pointing you towards healing. I know you will find your path of happiness

Did our ancestors have a better approach to depression?

Did our ancestors have a better solution to treating depression than modern times? Yes... the entire culture understood that people have melancholy. (Their word for emotional depression.) They also understoodthatrest was critical for recovery.

But also no. They didn't have understanding for head injuries, no psychotropic drugs, and no safety net to help people navigate mental issues resulting from abuse and injuries. However, not much has changed in popular definition of depression as a medical condition of sadness in the last two hundred years. It has a bit more medical jargon attached to it, and it's moved up a bit in Mr. Webster's dictionary, but we are just as far from finding a "cure" as our ancestors. Perhaps we are even farther from healing depression than our ancestors. Our modern social interactions are too friable and too callously brief. Information flows as a crushing tumult with ceaseless and suffocating pressure. The simple harmonies of nature are far removed by the clattering noise of our technology. In the end, we are pushed far adrift from the shores of happiness. Modern life is a rip-tide of denial pushing us ever away from the healing shores of empathy, compassion and solace. Our ancestors seemed to have more patience with each other in this matter of profound sadness. They seemed more willing to listen, help and comfort. The Internet might be great for information, but it is a heartless beast for compassion.Take, for example, that Abraham Lincoln suffered his entire life with crushing depression and yet was elected President (and it was widely know he was melancholy and he still won election). Continue reading

Depression doesn’t just magically go away – advice is not a cure

Depression Symptoms Decoded People will stop bleeding eventually, but something lingers of that wound always and forever in the person. So, injured people are stuck with the situation that causes thedepression.They cannot change the moment in time which precipitated the loss. Instead, they must change their approach if they want to defeat depression. That's what my work teaches. It will teach you to analyze your symptoms and formulate a successful plan of recovery. The application of my approach requires the individual reader to explore and identify their symptoms. It requires you to heal yourself. Continue reading

A wonderful dog watches his owner get hit. TBI depression versus a happy cure

My story in Depression Symptoms Decoded: I saw the black pickup round the curve in the distance. Its tires didn't squeal. The vehicle was traveling normally between the lines. It looked. well. it lookedsafe.<br/> My old dog, Bandit, walked over and sat in the ditch and waited for the truck to pass us. I got Bandit from the pound as a puppy and now he was ancient; a collie mix of some sort. He loved to walk with me. So it was just me and an old dog alone in the middle of nowhere Texas. Continue reading